Crimson staff writer

Maliya V. Ellis

Maliya V. Ellis is the Magazine Chair of the 149th Guard. She can be reached at maliya.ellis@thecrimson.com.

Latest Content


Fifteen Questions: Harvey Mansfield on Ideological Diversity, Trumpism, and his Signature Fedora

One of the University’s most prominent conservative faculty members sat down with Fifteen Minutes to discuss political polarization on campus. “The Harvard Commencement is something like the Democratic National Convention,” he says. “And that’s a hell of a way to run a university.”


Advice to Josh: What is Love?

February is scary for a lot of reasons: three of Taylor Swift’s exes have their birthdays this month, The Boy Scouts of America was founded back in February 1910, and Valentine’s Day exists. Between wondering why hearts don’t look like anatomical hearts and how the Datamatch algorithm works, this amorous holiday can be a confusing time for many people, but for no one more so than our cherished, forever-freshman Josh. He needs FM’s help to get to the root of what this holiday is all about. We’ve asked some of our writers to help Josh answer the age-old question: What is love?


Resuming Rituals at Appleton Chapel

At the front of the Memorial Church sanctuary, partially sequestered by an intricately-carved wooden panel, lies Appleton Chapel. Appleton is a beautiful corner of campus — and a piece of history — that few Harvard students ever experience. But it’s one of the places I feel most at home.


Is It Time to Consider Dimming the Sun?

Harvard’s Solar Geoengineering Research Program studies a climate intervention strategy that sounds straight out of a science fiction novel. In the past, scientists and politicians have written off solar geoengineering as too risky to even study. But as the planet approaches dangerous levels of warming, that calculus may be just about to change.


God, I Love Taking Covid Tests

You gather white envelopes, your embossing kit, and with a little Harvard directory perusing, compile a roster of the [redacted athletic] team in your Notes app. You slide a Covid test into each envelope, seal the edge with hot wax, and write names on the front in cursive. It’s hard work, but someone’s gotta do it.


Michelle Wu ’07 is Running for Mayor on a Green New Deal. What Does this Mean for Boston?

More than anything, the Green New Deal of Michelle Wu '07 celebrates the city of Boston. She draws on the city’s history of firsts — home to the country’s first public library, first public park, and first public school — to emphasize Boston’s potential to lead. “It’s because we realized the ways in which we’re interconnected and we can do that again,” she says of the city’s many firsts. “When Boston leads, we have an impact on this country’s trajectory.”


Live Theater Takes a Walk

While other theater companies tried to adapt plays for a Zoom setting, Lyric Stage, Boston's oldest theater company, was reluctant to entertain audiences through a screen. Instead, Lyric hoped to entertain without adding screen time by encouraging audiences to step into the city.


Walking Play with Map

The Walking Play outlines a specific path to take through Boston Common which corresponds to key events in the accompanying audio.


Christie A. Jackson

Christie A. Jackson ’21 answers with no hesitation when I ask her what her favorite color is. “I love yellow,” she says. Even through a computer screen, Jackson exudes a positivity and confidence that can best be described as sunny.