Cannes Film Festival 2021

The Harvard Crimson sends two writers — Joy C. Ashford ‘22-23 and Sofia Andrade ‘23-24 — to France to cover the 74th annual Cannes Film Festival.

Harvard Grad Student Union Files Unfair Labor Practice Charge Against University Over Information Requests

Harvard’s graduate student union filed an unfair labor practice charge against the University with the National Labor Relations Board Monday, alleging Harvard is not bargaining in good faith with the union by withholding necessary information about its unit and relevant University policies.

Harvard University Dining Services To Expand Meal Options, Change Hours for Fall 2021

Harvard University Dining Services will expand full-service breakfast to both Annenberg and Quincy and add brunch service on Saturdays in all houses beginning Aug. 20, HUDS Managing Director Smitha S. H. Haneef wrote in an email to the College Wednesday.




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The Rise and Fall of David Kane

The discovery of Kane’s involvement with the racist blog and the effect it had on students is indicative of the perils of allowing academic freedom to spill over into hate speech: On EphBlog, ‘Field’ would often make charts and graphs to legitimate his racist claims.

A Form of Hesitation

What happens when the lost object speaks; when, given these material and psychic limitations, we do try to express our malaise? What forms exist to communicate and grapple with Asian Americans’ public and private racial grief and outrage?



From Cannes: ‘Nitram’ is a Compelling, if Unsure, Look at the Makings of a National Tragedy

“Nitram” is undoubtedly a strong technical film, especially with Jones's lead performance. However, its convoluted relationship with mental health, and its self-confused goals of sharing the Port Arthur Massacre story still leaves it with plenty of room to grow.




From Cannes: ‘Nitram’ is a Compelling, if Unsure, Look at the Makings of a National Tragedy

“Nitram” is undoubtedly a strong technical film, especially with Jones's lead performance. However, its convoluted relationship with mental health, and its self-confused goals of sharing the Port Arthur Massacre story still leaves it with plenty of room to grow.

From Cannes: Portrait of an Artist: Christina Rose

The Harvard Crimson sat down with Rose while she was at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival to chat about identity, inspiration, hope, and what’s next for her career. This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

From Cannes: Surprise Chow Premiere is Truly a ‘Revolution of Our Times’

Not only does Chow work to distill a complicated problem into a moving documentary, but he also does critical work to show the protesters as genuine people, rather than radical talking heads.

From Cannes: ‘Women Do Cry’ is a Part Moving, Part Tone-Deaf Portrayal of Womanhood in Bulgaria

Though “Women Do Cry” has its strengths — genuine, intimate moments between female family members, moments of excellent acting from Bakalova and Stoyanova in particular — it shows a blatant disrespect for the LGBT community at every turn.


Senior Perspective: Gabrielle Fernandopulle

As of June 1, it’s been 562 days since we last competed. But I’ve felt the strength and lessons of my team more so in the last 562 days off the field than I could have imagined. Harvard Women’s Rugby, more than anything else at Harvard, taught me how to learn, how to be a teammate, and how to be brave.

Senior Perspective: Matt Thomas

It’s a strange thing to have the last 75 games of your collegiate career cancelled. In fact, during my four years, I only played in one-third as many. The Harvard Baseball Team has been such a core part of my identity in college, so I struggled to find direction and purpose when it was taken away. What did it mean to be a Harvard baseball player if we didn’t play any games?

Around the Ivies: One Last Time

Maybe it’s just the graduation goggles, but I realized that I don’t need football to do one of my favorite things as a Crimson reporter: write my Around the Ivies column. Although it may be harder to berate the Brown football program — don’t worry, I still will — the Ancient Eight is still alive even without sports. So without further ado, let’s take one last trip Around the Ivies.

With the Olympics Around the Corner, Harvard and Radcliffe Rowers Prepare to Make Their Mark

Dean is the only enrolled Crimson rower headed to the Olympics, but not the only Harvard affiliate; alumni Andrew Reed, Alexander Richards ’18, Conor Harrity ’18, Liam Corrigan ’19, and Olivia Coffey ’11 from the Radcliffe team are competing for America. Sam Hardy ’18 and Josh Hicks ’13 are competing for Australia, and Jüri-Mikk Udam ’17 is rowing for Estonia.


From Cannes: ‘Nitram’ is a Compelling, if Unsure, Look at the Makings of a National Tragedy

“Nitram” is undoubtedly a strong technical film, especially with Jones's lead performance. However, its convoluted relationship with mental health, and its self-confused goals of sharing the Port Arthur Massacre story still leaves it with plenty of room to grow.

From Cannes: Portrait of an Artist: Christina Rose

The Harvard Crimson sat down with Rose while she was at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival to chat about identity, inspiration, hope, and what’s next for her career. This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

From Cannes: Surprise Chow Premiere is Truly a ‘Revolution of Our Times’

Not only does Chow work to distill a complicated problem into a moving documentary, but he also does critical work to show the protesters as genuine people, rather than radical talking heads.

From Cannes: ‘Women Do Cry’ is a Part Moving, Part Tone-Deaf Portrayal of Womanhood in Bulgaria

Though “Women Do Cry” has its strengths — genuine, intimate moments between female family members, moments of excellent acting from Bakalova and Stoyanova in particular — it shows a blatant disrespect for the LGBT community at every turn.


Senior Perspective: Gabrielle Fernandopulle

As of June 1, it’s been 562 days since we last competed. But I’ve felt the strength and lessons of my team more so in the last 562 days off the field than I could have imagined. Harvard Women’s Rugby, more than anything else at Harvard, taught me how to learn, how to be a teammate, and how to be brave.

Senior Perspective: Matt Thomas

It’s a strange thing to have the last 75 games of your collegiate career cancelled. In fact, during my four years, I only played in one-third as many. The Harvard Baseball Team has been such a core part of my identity in college, so I struggled to find direction and purpose when it was taken away. What did it mean to be a Harvard baseball player if we didn’t play any games?

Around the Ivies: One Last Time

Maybe it’s just the graduation goggles, but I realized that I don’t need football to do one of my favorite things as a Crimson reporter: write my Around the Ivies column. Although it may be harder to berate the Brown football program — don’t worry, I still will — the Ancient Eight is still alive even without sports. So without further ado, let’s take one last trip Around the Ivies.

With the Olympics Around the Corner, Harvard and Radcliffe Rowers Prepare to Make Their Mark

Dean is the only enrolled Crimson rower headed to the Olympics, but not the only Harvard affiliate; alumni Andrew Reed, Alexander Richards ’18, Conor Harrity ’18, Liam Corrigan ’19, and Olivia Coffey ’11 from the Radcliffe team are competing for America. Sam Hardy ’18 and Josh Hicks ’13 are competing for Australia, and Jüri-Mikk Udam ’17 is rowing for Estonia.