Fox Club Received Eviction Notice From Landlord Over Noise Complaints, Zoning Code Violations

The Fox Club moved out of a Cambridge residential neighborhood after the property owner served the club with an eviction notice following warnings from the city that their use of the space violated local ordinances.​​​​​​​

‘Taxation Without Representation’: What the NCAA’s $2.8 Billion Settlement Means for Harvard

A nearly $2.8 billion settlement proposed by the National College Athletics Association and the Power Five Conferences will allow collegiate athletes to be paid by their universities — a historic shift that may leave Harvard Athletics bleeding.

City Officials Say Charter Review’s Proposed Election Reforms Pose Legal Challenges

Cambridge City officials raised legal and practical concerns about local election reform recommendations made by the Charter Review Committee, adding further uncertainty to a process already marred by confusion.





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‘Hyped Just About Right’: How the AI Boom is Reshaping Research at Harvard

As ChatGPT took the world by storm, many raised concerns about how it might help students cheat themselves out of learning. But a year and a half later, AI is changing the work of professors perhaps even more.

The Academic Policing of Academics on Policing

In 2022, professors Christopher Lewis and Adaner Usmani argued that to reduce violent crime, the U.S. needs to drastically shorten its prison sentences — and increase its police force by half a million officers. Their ideas soon become a flashpoint of online discourse.




Dominance on the Ice: The 1999 Women’s Ice Hockey Team's Long Legacy

In what marks the 25th anniversary of the Harvard women’s ice hockey team’s historic triple-crown season, the team’s national championship run and the grit, perseverance, and dominance the squad displayed throughout that entire season is still spoken about with hushed reverence.


‘What It Is’ Review: Harnessing Images for Creativity

Lynda Barry’s “What It Is” is not just a creative scrapbook but an experience full of thought-provoking questions, doodles, and writing.

‘Uncle Vanya’ Preserves Chekhov’s Hilarious, Dark, Tender Humanity for Today’s World

The contemporary setting of Heidi Schreck’s translation of “Uncle Vanya” feels so natural that one could miss the change entirely.

From Cannes: ‘The Substance’ is a Sparkling and Divisive Body Horror

It is nearly unimaginable to not feel seen by French director Coralie Fargeat’s “The Substance,” which premiered at the 77th Annual Cannes Film Festival.

Artist Profile: Morgan Parker on ‘You Get What You Pay For’ and the Journey Towards Interconnected Identity

Morgan Parker discusses her new book, "You Get What You Pay For," and the difficulty of healing, self-discovery, and empathizing with others.


Dominance on the Ice: The 1999 Women’s Ice Hockey Team's Long Legacy

In what marks the 25th anniversary of the Harvard women’s ice hockey team’s historic triple-crown season, the team’s national championship run and the grit, perseverance, and dominance the squad displayed throughout that entire season is still spoken about with hushed reverence.

Heartbeat Heroes: Varsity Team Managers

Often considered “the heartbeat of the team,” team managers play an integral role in varsity sports. The Crimson sat down with four managers from Harvard’s basketball, lacrosse, and squash programs to learn more about the position.

‘Everybody’s Kind of Blue’: Harvard’s Last-Second Loss to Brown is the Heartbreak of the Year

The Harvard football team’s loss against nemesis Yale, which resulted in the team having to split the Ivy League title three ways, might seem like an apt choice for the Heartbreak of the Year. But the football team still shared a slice of the conference title. The men’s basketball team wasn’t so lucky.

Competing Equally at Last: 50 Years of the Harvard-Radcliffe Athletics Merger

Harvard University and Radcliffe College merged in 1974 in a decision that came on the heels of the passage of Title IX and carried major implications for the future of athletics at Harvard.


‘What It Is’ Review: Harnessing Images for Creativity

Lynda Barry’s “What It Is” is not just a creative scrapbook but an experience full of thought-provoking questions, doodles, and writing.

‘Uncle Vanya’ Preserves Chekhov’s Hilarious, Dark, Tender Humanity for Today’s World

The contemporary setting of Heidi Schreck’s translation of “Uncle Vanya” feels so natural that one could miss the change entirely.

From Cannes: ‘The Substance’ is a Sparkling and Divisive Body Horror

It is nearly unimaginable to not feel seen by French director Coralie Fargeat’s “The Substance,” which premiered at the 77th Annual Cannes Film Festival.

Artist Profile: Morgan Parker on ‘You Get What You Pay For’ and the Journey Towards Interconnected Identity

Morgan Parker discusses her new book, "You Get What You Pay For," and the difficulty of healing, self-discovery, and empathizing with others.



Dominance on the Ice: The 1999 Women’s Ice Hockey Team's Long Legacy

In what marks the 25th anniversary of the Harvard women’s ice hockey team’s historic triple-crown season, the team’s national championship run and the grit, perseverance, and dominance the squad displayed throughout that entire season is still spoken about with hushed reverence.

Heartbeat Heroes: Varsity Team Managers

Often considered “the heartbeat of the team,” team managers play an integral role in varsity sports. The Crimson sat down with four managers from Harvard’s basketball, lacrosse, and squash programs to learn more about the position.

‘Everybody’s Kind of Blue’: Harvard’s Last-Second Loss to Brown is the Heartbreak of the Year

The Harvard football team’s loss against nemesis Yale, which resulted in the team having to split the Ivy League title three ways, might seem like an apt choice for the Heartbreak of the Year. But the football team still shared a slice of the conference title. The men’s basketball team wasn’t so lucky.

Competing Equally at Last: 50 Years of the Harvard-Radcliffe Athletics Merger

Harvard University and Radcliffe College merged in 1974 in a decision that came on the heels of the passage of Title IX and carried major implications for the future of athletics at Harvard.