Contributing writer

Sophia N. Downs

Latest Content


The Class of 1857 and the Gate They Left

If you’ve ever stepped foot on Harvard’s campus, you’ve seen the Wadsworth gate, though you may not have realized it. Nestled between the urban bustle of Harvard Square and the red brick of the Yard, I walk past it nearly every day, but rarely do I stop to ponder its history. The gate is also called the Class of 1857 Gate after the class that sponsored it — a class whose joyful graduation barely preceded the advent of the Civil War.


When the Knot Has Been Tied

For Thompson as well as James K. McGlinchey ’25 and Dylan A. Pancoast ’23, Harvard was not the first stop after high school. All three served in the military for six to eight years before coming to Harvard, during which time they got married. All three currently live off campus, away from the hustle and bustle of house life.  In fact, the Harvard College Handbook states that the university “does not offer undergraduate housing in the Houses or dorms to married undergraduates and/or undergraduates with families.” Since 98% of all Harvard undergraduates live in the Houses, living off campus makes these married students clear outliers.


Northern Lights Come to Cambridge

Welcome to “Borealis,” the art installation that served as the centerpiece of this year’s Cambridge Science Festival — a weeklong celebration of science, technology, engineering, art, and math.