Crimson staff writer

Paul G. Sullivan

Associate Editor Paul G. Sullivan can be reached at paul.sullivan@thecrimson.com.

Latest Content


The Rise and Fall of David Kane

The discovery of Kane’s involvement with the racist blog and the effect it had on students is indicative of the perils of allowing academic freedom to spill over into hate speech: On EphBlog, ‘Field’ would often make charts and graphs to legitimate his racist claims.


Barbara A. Oedayrajsingh Varma

After finishing her workday, which actually consists of three jobs, all of which she completes from her apartment, Barbara A. Oedayrajsingh Varma goes on a walk through her neighborhood in the Shoreditch district of London.


Falling in Love with Dua Lipa Again

I don’t know if I’ll fall in love this summer or who I’ll fall in love with and I have no idea what our world is going to be like, but, goddamn, I am in love with Dua Lipa right now.


Purple Babies: Notes to Keith Haring

My baby Keith, even when you were purple, you acted like a baby. You left this world the same way you entered it: nonjudgmental, pure of mind, seeing the world with a simple, singular clarity.


Girl’s Shoes in Gay Pornography

Porn is nothing if not essentializing. In most scenes, these actors are merely the sexually submissive partner. In other scenes, though, scenes which script out and eroticize sexual violence, these actors are cast as victim.


Why We Don't Wear Harvard Gear

No one wanted to wear it. We threw it around the circle like we were playing a game of hot potato, chucking it from one person to the next, shrieking “You wear it!” “No, you wear it!” Everyone wanted to wear Olivia’s other sweatshirts, which were faded and looked vintage, or her fisherman sweaters. To wear the Harvard sweatshirt would mean being the odd one out.


Reading Pete

I want to root for the kind of person whose prose is occasionally sloppy, whose opinions aren’t just rigid but also rigorous and sometimes even risky, the type of person who doesn’t need to fall back on Yeats to understand the present day, or who fails to read “Ulysses” because they were doing something other than what was assigned for tomorrow’s class.